1971-bultaco-el-montadero-360_1

The El Montadero, or Mountaineer, was Bultaco’s big bore enduro bike from 1968 to 1972, the big brother of the Matador and one of the original dual sport bikes. It was a tamed version El Bandido 360 motocrosser, with a broader power band, a little more rake to the fork, and used a range of other components from parts bins at Bultaco or from Spanish suppliers they counted on. Toward the end of production the Mark II offered a more tractable engine, larger flywheel, more fuel capacity and a revised frame.

Bultaco’s origins are the day Francisco Bulto left the Montessa company with 12 employees to develop a new brand of motorcycle. It is said Bulto could not talk Montessa into factory sponsored racing to help sell motorcycles. And Bultaco went on to dominate in Trials, Road Racing, Enduro and Motocross from time to time in its history.

Like other European manufacturers of the time, repurposing components for different motorcycle types was typical. Bultaco was able to create trials, motocross, enduro and road racing machines with a core group of major engine/transmission components, hubs, supplied forks, rims, fenders and shocks yet design frames to specific function. Most bodywork, and certainly the graphics and Spanish names were unique to a given machine. This fine El Montadero is on loan to the National Motorcycle Museum from James Slaughter and it’s one of many off-road motorcycles on display at the Museum. It’s likely several display bikes will bring back memories of your personal riding history.

Specifications:

    • Engine: Single Cylinder, Two-Stroke
    • Bore and Stroke: 85mm x 64mm
    • Displacement: 363cc’s
    • Induction: 32mm Amal
    • Ignition: Motoplat CDI Electronic
    • Lubrication: Pre-mix
    • Starting: Folding Kickstarter
    • Compression Ratio: 10.5 : 1
    • Horsepower: 32HP
    • Primary: Gear Driven
    • Transmission: 4-Speed
    • Frame: Steel, Double Loop/Cradle
    • Suspension: Betor Telescopic Fork/Dual Betor Shocks
    • Wheelbase: 56 Inches
    • Wheels/Tires: 3.00 x 21 / 4.50 x 18
6 replies
  1. Stephen Bush
    Stephen Bush says:

    He sure could build a beautiful bike.I my self own a 76 Alpina 350 . Trying to sell it for 2000 or best offer. Runs in great shape

    Reply
  2. J.D. Long
    J.D. Long says:

    The Spanish bikes were the hottest things you could get in their day. Bultacos were always the best looking. In the early’70s my riding buddies had a Bultaco, a Montesa, and I had an Ossa – good times.

    Reply

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